Policies

Welcome to the Language Acquisition and Resource Center! The LARC serves the language practice needs of the more than 3000 students enrolled in GSU language classes through a wealth of digital resource materials and tutoring. A few simple guidelines can help to make the LARC a relaxed and enjoyable learning environment for everyone.

 

• Use of the LARC is limited to students currently enrolled in language classes in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Applied Linguistics (IEP), and the Middle East Institute. Faculty in these departments may also use the LARC.

  • All patrons must check in at the front desk with their Panther Card.
  • No eating or drinking is allowed in the LARC. The first warning for a student will consist of asking them to either put their items away or throw them away. The second warning will consist of asking the student to leave the lab.
  • Turn off all cell phones upon entry to the LARC (or set to vibrate). Talking on a cell phone while in the LARC will not be tolerated as it is a disturbance to others.
  • All LARC materials are for in-lab use only. Students may check out lab materials for use in the lab, but may not remove them from the lab.
  • Patrons are responsible for LARC materials checked out in their name. Materials must be returned in the same condition in which they were checked out, otherwise the patron is responsible for the replacement cost.
  • Printing and computer resources are for language practice only. With more than 3,000 students taking language classes and only 52 computer workstations, we cannot allow students to monopolize the resources for personal non-educational purposes. For general web-surfing or extended email checking, please use of the of the open-access labs on campus. Students needing to do language course-specific activities (listening, recording, etc) will have priority over students doing non-language activities.
  • Photocopying is not available in the LARC.
  • The front desk telephone is for LARC staff use only.
  • Please remember that this is an educational environment. Speak softly and be considerate of other patrons, just as you would in a library.
  • Please clean up after yourself. When you leave the LARC, please do not leave trash on the workstation or table.

Because the LARC offers walk-in tutoring for multiple languages at no additional charge, some policies and guidelines were established to ensure fair and equitable access to all.

  • Private tutoring may be limited at the discretion of the tutor. Some tutors may be working with multiple students at one time. During peak times (right before a large exam) students may only have access to a tutor for 15 – 20 minutes. The following practices will help make the most of your available time.
  • Plan ahead for the assistance you need. Come prepared to show the tutor the specific items or concepts that you’d like to cover.
  • Do not wait until the last minute to come for assistance. Most of the language courses have common exams given on the same day. As a result, the LARC becomes very crowded on those days and tutoring becomes more limited. If you have questions after your language class, please visit the LARC at the next possible opportunity to have them addressed. Not only is this the best way to learn, but it also ensures that you have the answers you need before the big test.
  • Tutors will not proofread, correct or edit compositions for you. Please see the proofreading policy for more information on how to work with the tutor on writing assignments.


The emphasis of the tutoring services at the LARC is on helping you become a better writer and speaker of your target language through additional, focused instruction in grammar and
vocabulary use. We can’t proofread, edit or correct a composition for you. That would make us better editors, but it would not make you a better writer. However, we will help you learn how to be a better proofreader and writer in the context of your language studies.

We recommend that you come to us early in the semester and that you give yourself sufficient time between the first draft of your composition and the due date. There is not much we can do to help you if you come to us with a first draft one hour before it is due.

Keep in mind that the LARC tutoring is not a proofreading or error-correction service, so you can’t expect the tutor to correct your mistakes for you. You are responsible for the content,
the language, and the correctness of your paper. You and the tutor must make decisions together about what changes are necessary.
.

Because the LARC offers walk-in tutoring for multiple languages at no additional charge, some policies and guidelines were established to ensure fair and equitable access to all.

  • Private tutoring may be limited at the discretion of the tutor. Some tutors may be working with multiple students at one time. During peak times (right before a large exam) students may only have access to a tutor for 15 – 20 minutes. The following practices will help make the most of your available time.
  • Plan ahead for the assistance you need. Come prepared to show the tutor the specific items or concepts that you’d like to cover.
  • Do not wait until the last minute to come for assistance. Most of the language courses have common exams given on the same day. As a result, the LARC becomes very crowded on those days and tutoring becomes more limited. If you have questions after your language class, please visit the LARC at the next possible opportunity to have them addressed. Not only is this the best way to learn, but it also ensures that you have the answers you need before the big test.
  • Tutors will not proofread, correct or edit compositions for you. Please see the proofreading policy for more information on how to work with the tutor on writing assignments.

When you ask a tutor to look at your paper, here’s what you can expect:

  • You must bring a completed draft with you to the LARC. The tutor will not help you to write the initial draft of your composition.
  • The tutor will read the composition quickly to get a sense of what it is about and what you are trying to say.
  • The tutor will begin to point out grammatical and stylistic problems and explain the rules and concepts behind them. It is important that you pay close attention and make corrections and notes yourself. The tutor will help you identify your most common problems in order to help you with future assignments.
  • If your paper is a long assignment, such as a term paper, there will not be enough time to discuss the entire assignment. You and the tutor must decide which parts are the most critical.
  • After the tutoring session, you should proofread the rest of the paper yourself, looking for specific problems that your tutor pointed out.

The policy described above is designed to help you become a more independent language learner and improve your own proofreading skills. With practice and experience, you
should be able to catch many of your most problematic errors yourself!

 
We are proud to announce that the DOE Title VI application to establish a National Language Resource Center at... via @gsumcl 2 weeks ago